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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
to gettbetter or worse this year. teaching science to city elementaay schhol students ggt &pnational science foundation. stephanie rawlings- blake were on hand at arlington elementary school in northwest baltimore to announce a 7 point 4 million dollar grant between johns hopkinn university nd the city school syssem.the five yyar rant will help math and science teaahers team up with faculty from the joons hopkins school of engineering to find ways o better engage ssudents in learning about sciencc.. 3:11"hoo proud you must be, to school...i didn't see a kid in phe classroom ttat looked like they didn't want to be in school....they weee excitee abouttschool"...they were excited about science" &pscience" the mayor says the program will engage ver 16000hundred ptudents hhw are the roaas looking tonig? report. e report..- pbelairwwlkensmaps395map - 3 one teenaaer ii the target f a cruul joke...how the last laugh. i'm candace doll in os annelesson thh see oo new girr. check it out this is the apartment hat you seeeevery season. season 2 t all ssarts tonight on fox45, but we're g
information moresfrecpark.org. -- >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see pe
for biological purposes, evolutionary purposes, for kids. it is also great for science. if we can get an age out of this mastadon, a mammoth columbi, we will get an age and plug the data into the paleoclimate graphs we have. we have a lot of sea level fluctuations already recorded that. gives us information. we can tie this into a sea level curve of sea level lows, which reflect ice cages and global warmings throughout 600 million years. we use those data to project to the future of what the earth has naturally been doing. it is also good for -- age dates are incredibly important for all walks of geology. we use them to figure out how old young units are. if they are cut by a fault, we know the fault happened and the seismicity occurred after the unit was deposited. if we get an age we can say when. everyone is asking when the next big one will be. based on our recurrence interval based on earthquakes from ages of things like this, we can have a potential hypothesis when the next earthquake will be, based on the fossil finds. it is great for everybody. this is original so we can probably get a
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
if japanese tsunami debris has come aboard. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: you can see the occasional bit of plastic on the beach but volunteers cleared beaches from santa cruz to monterey. >> reporter: in a warehouse they call the trash lab researchers went through a tiny fraction of the 8-tons volunteers picked up. >> our beaches are bees used heavily and we are still leaving stuff behind. >> shoes, socks, cans, bottles, all kinds of stuff. you name it, we can find it on the beach. >> reporter: they are on the look out for debris from the japanese sunomy. -- tsunami. >> someone was eating on the beach and left it there. >> 1.5 million tons swept out to sea from japan. officials said a dozen confirmed from japan. none in california. >> it is a big ocean. much can sink. it is phenomenal that individual items will find their ways to the shores. >> reporter: researchers were identifying dangerous stuff. >> getting a better understanding of the hazards out there. >> reporter: scientists are hoping to convince manufacturers and policy makers to protect our ocea
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
. especially in critical areas that turned up in that new staffing report. subjects like math, computer science, science areas like physics and chemistry, special- education, english as a second language, and world languages. this math teacher is evidence of what is possible. >> i love where i am. love teaching and i love the building and in. the kids are great. i like it a lot. >> he got his start with a baltimore county scholarship to encourage high school students to choose a teaching career. >> we think is really cool a former graduate our school would be able to come back and be a teacher. the faculty is very excited about it. especially teachers to have him as a student here. >> more than 100 high-school students are setting their sights on teaching. >> i demand -- there already planning lessons and designing activities and it's really nice. >> the state is going after people who would consider teaching as a second career. to see the entire report, log onto our web site, wbaltv.com, and click on education. >> foreign-policy is the focus in tonight pasqua been 20 will report. >> how the ca
, and other research is a tuition for developing the next-generation of sciences in the biomedical spear and for generating new ideas in the bio tech industry and several others depend on. despite all of these good things, there has been little change in the budgets since the 5-year doubling of the budget. when the count in inflation, we are back in buying power. with the rapid growth of the medical community and increased expense of bioscience work, the success rate for grant applicants has fallen to an all- time low to about 14% of nci and 17% nih wide. that is an ironic comment at the time when the scientific opportunities are remarkably high in part because many prior investments -- and the result of deciphering the blueprint of living organisms through the human genome project. they analyze the chromosomes of many microorganisms. the ability to support and enlarging and scientific community, the by medical ecosystem is under unusual stress. there is more investment elsewhere in other countries and more stable environment for research. we are running the risk of losing leadership to
, but wt i've proposed moving forward, building off of the race to the top, let's hire new math and science teachers who are trained in math and science without being thrown i the classroom without the eparioey. focus on early childhood education. part of our race to the top is let's figure out what are the dropout factories out there. some schools are really underperforming. let' transform tho schools. and all tseitont we have to do is combine creativity and evidence-based approaches. so let's not use ideology. let's figure out what works and combine that with resources. and this is big argument and big difference that i'ot gnoomney in this election. they talk a good game about reform, but when you actually look at budgets, they're talking about slashing our investment education by 20, 25%. we've already seen 300,000 teachers that have been fired ross the country, and a a consequence class sizes have gone up by 5%. and when you talk with a teacher -- i was meeting wita couple of teachers in las vegas -- they said they've got 42 kids in a class, some of them sitting on floor. it takes a cou
get violently sick. >> new science shows you increase the size of the brain because you stimulate brain growth. when you do things like physical activity. you induce changes in your genes. >> reporter: these scans show the reward senters reacting to a chocolate milkshake. for some people the pleasure receptors turn off. for others it keeps reacting, wanting more. by focusing on the three ms. mind, mouth and muscle. the doctor thinks you can restrain the brain. tara is in what dr. peak calls master recovery. she did something beyond her wild dreams. finished an iron man triathlon. >> no dream is improblem. >> reporter: tara said she'll be a recovering food addict but knowing that is a victory. >> i wish i could be normal with it. but it will be okay. >> "the hunger fix " is in stors now. >>> up next the president's candid moments. secret recordings of john f. kennedy. plus "dancing's" biggest stars back. we talked with tom bergeron about dancing with the all stars. and retire with more? then don't get nickle and dimed by high cost investments and annoying account fees. at e-trade,
science to that, as well, when i was governor. two, they worked on a statewide curriculum. it took a number of years, but they had a series of elements they felt students needed to learn. three, they would evaluate annually the success of various schools. all the schools actually. and if a school consistently fell below a passing grade, then the state had the capacity to step in, take over the school, remove its leadership, and actually remove elements of the union contract if they believed those elements interfered with the education of a child. beyond that, i had the chance not just to have this, if you will, the stick if you can't pass the graduation exam you can't graduate, i also worked to put in place a carrot, an incentive. while i was governor, we passed legislation that said that if you took the exam to graduate and you were among the top quarter in your high school in terms of the grade you got on that exam, then you were entitled to the john and an about a gail adams scholarship, which was four years tuition free at any massachusetts public institution of higher learning
of english, at least three years of mathematics, at least three years of science and at least three years of social science, comparedded to those who students who did not complete a core curriculum, those students completing a core curriculum scored 144 points higher on the s.a.t. >> suarez: what do we know about the predictive value of the test itself? you have a threshold for college readiness. if you go into an institution of higher learning without reaching that threshold, are you automatically going to fail, not complete? what do we know? >> absolutely not. that threshold is a guide. it allows us to look at groups of students. what we know is that the group of students who meet the threshold have a 65% likelihood of achieving a b-minus g.p.a. or higher during their freshman year. obviously there are other factors that admission officers take into consideration. but it does help guide us in thinking about where we are and the need to have more students better prepared for college. currently of 100 ninth graders, 44 will go on to college. yet only 21 will graduate within a six-year per
viewed more than 4- 1/2 million times. in the video he says evolution is fundamental to all life science and parents should not encourage children to reject it. he produced this in response to efforts to present bible stories as a alternative to evolution in public schools. >>> a turn for a big rig accident. the driver lost control of a 18 wheeler filled with beer. it happened yesterday in downtown. the driver took the exit too fast that caused the rig to flip. it doesn't appear the driver was under the influence. >>> a condition called zombie bees has been discovered in washington. it causes bees to fly at night and lurch till they die. a bee keeper in washington found the first bees in that state. a biologist in san francisco discovered them in california in 2008. he uses a website to track it across the country. >>> mayor ed lee alawed the commission on -- applauded the commission on domestic violence. mayor ed lee said the commission helped cut domestic violence homicides by 80% and he promised to improve those numbers even more. >> to keep that work up. to keep the issues in front o
-changing high-tech world. >> the science has grown dramatically in the last 20 years. and it will be a gradual transition. but i think it's the way yes we have to do. it is the way of the future. and with the science advancing as rapidly as it is, i think it makes good sense. >> reporter: lanier praises the current officers who will get other uniform duties. the new $220 million headquarters of the city's chief medical examiner and state-of-the-art laboratories for crime scene analysis. it's due to open on monday and expected to improve police and prosecution work on thousands of cases. the chief medical officer responsible for all death investigations also will move from its rundown headquarters near the old d.c. general hospital to the new facility that will be run by a civilian director. but the d.c. fraternal order of police union says the city is making a mistake replacing seasoned sworn officers who know crime scenes. >> unless you're going to replace the experts, and that's what those guys are, experts, with experts, then that's potentially a problem. >> reporter: the union contends the
is great. americans are 14th in reading, 17th in science, 25th in math, among 34 countries at the top. this summit's focus is on solutions, one of the big topics today. how the curriculum in our schools is about to change in a big way. our chief education correspondent, rehema ellis is at the new york public library tonight. good evening, rehema. >> reporter: good evening, brian, the numbers you just mentioned tell a clear story, which is why the nation's governors adopted the common core curriculum. this new, tougher more demanding standard of learning is generating buzz at the summit, as teachers are gearing up to teach a new way. at this elementary school in louisville, all 361 students are encouraged to think big. >> every day at jba is one day closer to? >> college. >> college. >> reporter: ranking near the bottom on standardized tests, kentucky was quick to incorporate the tests, a blueprint for english and math, adopted by every state. while there is no common curriculum, this raises academic standards nationwide. and for the first time, an a will mean the same thing for studen
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
morning news.. all local.. all morning. ((break 4)) teaching kids science and technology.the huge bbost the city school system is getting. tonight on fox 45 nees at five. 3 -live llok haabor 33 3 33 3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 fiber map 3 the balttmore city police departmenttis takinn a closer look at the circumstances surrounding the death of a man in police custody. the deparrment is now launching a criminal investigation into his eath. death. joel d. smith is live at policc headquarters wwth some witnesses say... thhe are not surrrised. good morning joel d. good morning patrice ever since patrice ever since anthhny anderson dieddin policee ustody friday, family and friends have complained they weren't hearing the whole wrong. police have not s wron. officially identifiid the man, but friends and family say thhs is himm.. 46 year old anthony andeesoo. witnesses say he was near the corner of streets ,,visiting his clothes officerrjumped from an unmarked ar and confronted initially police said anderson died from choking on drrgs he that's incorrect. witenesses say even if police
. teaching kids science and technology.the huge bbost the city school system is getting. tonight on fox 45 nees at five. 3 pá7 day forecastáá 3 ((break 8)) 33 debt collectors
and schools. vote for question seven. teaching kids science and technology.the huge bbost the city school system is getting. tonight on fox 45 nees at 3ive. 3 3 3
graders for drugs, how about we test for knowledge of mathematics and eke lish and science? let's start with that. >> as a libertarian conspiracy theorist, don't you think the whole point of this is to condition kids to get used to the state poking their noses in our lives. you get used to getting drug tested in seventh grade and then the tsa wants to jam its finger wherever you are like, i have been used to this my whole life. >> there is no doubt that we are just getting more and more conditioned to have intrusions into our personal life and privacy all the time. you think there is a huge problem with kids joining glee using performance enhancing drugs 1234 ones that require drug testing? i like the only person who said this was the guy who owned a drug testing company. never saw that one coming. >> you are not claiming he has a vested interest? >> no, not at all. >> have you no proof of that whatsoever. >> none whatsoever. >> do you look at this as another test you would have failed in middle school? >> yes. i didn't like the personal attack. i am right on board with the baron bus. l
that crees e nt l the e lill university from the window of modern science, the more it looks mind like than machine-like. the universe is not a physical machine. it works like your body works. your body has a hundr trillion cells which is more than the cells in the milkiway galaxy. er cell is tracking whatvery other cell is doing. how does a human body thing thoughts, play piano, make a baby all at the same time because yoiologilhy are a symphony of the universe and you dance to the music even though you can't name the tune. this is so mind-boggling that there's no physical ef explanation for it. there's a mind and it' onl nipny tanlt, on nish ant, on knee press ant and you can't change. >> one of the things that fascinates me in my generation there's been a decline in uracticed organization, ing to buil there's been more of a do it yourself phase. >> right. the questions don't go away. >> can you gel get the fulfillment without being part of an organized religion? li.i think that'she fute o it's going to be secular, universal, hold onto the truths of organized religion. organized rehis has
with all civilian forensic technicians in a fast-changing high-tech world. >> the science has grown dramatically in the last 20 years. and it will be a gradual transition. i think it's the way we have to go. it is the way of the future. with the science advancing as rapidly as it, i think it makes good sense. >> reporter: lanier praises the current officers who will get other uniform duties. the current chief medical examiner responsible for all death investigations will get moved from the old d.c. general hospital to the new facility that will be run bay civilian director. but the d.c. fraternal order of police union says the city is making a mistake replacing seasoned, sworn officers who know crime scenes. >> unless you're going to replace the experts, and that's massachusetts what those guys are, with experts, then that's potentially a problem. >> reporter: the union contends the city has failed to hire enough officers and is stretching the force to fill vacancies, while many officers quit or retire. >> we're going to continue to lose folks as the conditions inside the agency det
, a new ad campaign that seems like it's straight out of a science fiction novel. ♪ [ sighs ] [ bird chirps ] [ bird squawks ] ♪ [ bird screeching ] ♪ [ elevator bell dings ] [ sighs ] how mad is she? she kicked me out. but i took the best stuff. i'll get the wrench. ♪ [ male announcer ] kohler's tresham collection. life. with a twist. ♪ life. with a twist. ♪ chirping beeping camera ahhhh drill sound chirping electric shaver shaking remote tapping sound shaking drill chirping tapping shaking remote wouldn't it be great to have one less battery to worry about? car honking irping the 2012 sonata hybrid. the only hybrid with a lifetime hybrid battery warranty. from hyundai. agents, say hello to the biggest hailstone in u.s. history. oh, that will leave a dent. which is exactly why we educate people... about comprehensive coverage. yep. the right choice now can pay off later. [ announcer ] we are insurance. ♪ we are farmers bum-pa-dum, bum-bum-bum-bum ♪ on december 21st polar shifts will reverse the earth's gravitational pull and hurtle us all into space. which would render
, a new ad campaign that seems like is straight out of a science fiction novel. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. ♪ [ sighs ] [ bird chirps ] [ bird squawks ] ♪ [ bird screeching ] ♪ [ elevator bell dings ] [ sighs ] how mad is she? she kicked me out. but i took the best stuff. i'll get the wrench. ♪ [ male announcer ] kohler's tresham collection. life. with a twist. ♪ life. with a twist. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learnour risk. we know you. we know you have to rise early... and work late, with not enough sleep in between. how you sometimes need to get over to that exi
're the -- >> are they lud indicts, anti-science? >> i think if they're convinced, as many of them are, that science is being used as a conspiracy to take away their freedom and take away their independence -- >> i saw that movie, it's called "planet of the apes" and it wasn't a comedy pup. >> we watch fox, we listen to it, that's the message that you get. that the scientists and the bureaucrats are combining to rob us of our freedom. >> so it's basically a fear, it's a fear of everything. take a look at this number though. the infamous birth question, was the president born in the united states. under our constitution he has to be born here to be president. ohio republican primary voters, 37% they do not think barack obama was born here. just 2 in 5 say the president was american born and, therefore, a legitimate president. when you ask the president's religion, this gets scary. a majority of all voters don't take him at his word. just 49%. this is all voters, say he's a christian, which is what he says he is. and 30% of republicans and 34% of conservative republicans say obama is a muslim. simple as that.
are the nostalgia party. they're the simplicity party. they're the -- >> are they luddites, anti-science? >> i think if they're convinced, as many of them are, that science is being used as a conspiracy to take away their freedom and take away their independence -- >> i saw that movie, it's called "planet of the apes" and it wasn't a comedy. >> as i'm sure joe and i listen to -- we watch fox, we listen because have you to cover the whole spectrum as a reporter, that's the -- that's the message that you get. that the scientists and the bureaucrats are combining to rob us of our freedom. >> so it's basically a fear, it a fr of everying. ke aoo tnu th the infamous birther question. was the president born in the united states? under our constitution he has to be born here to be president. io republican primary voters, people who voted already this year 37% don't think barack obama was born here. 25 thest was american born and, therefore, a legitimate president. when you ask the president's religion, this gets scary. a majority of all voters don't take him at his word. just 49%. this is all voters, say h
in math, reading, and science. former secretary of state condoleezza rice says that gap threatens national security. >> the level of writing skills, analytic skills is a reason for concern. the idea that you have to be able to write based on text, to write based on fact, to be able to analyze, these are the sorts of skills that even our best students are not acquiring. >> experts say it's vital the education system focus on the whole child and not just on test scores. >>> south bay olympic gold medalist kerri walsh jennings was carrying something extra with her in london. she was five weeks pregnant while competing in london. the couple made the announcement this morning to matt lauer. she had been feeling a bit moody during the olympics. she had no idea, and then discovered she was pregnant. we were with her in london. she didn't seem that moody to us. >> yeah, i thought it could have been the stress of the games and travel kind of throws your schedule off a little bit. but you don't know. i knew. and at some point, you know, you're late and then you start feeling something. and i definit
as they went along, everything from soil science to irrigation techniqu. and before they knew it, they had developed a thriving avocado orchard along the way. they now have 8,500 avocado trees, trees that have come to mean more to the couple than they ever could have imagined. >> we like to think that we have 8,500 employees working for us here at the facility on our area. and we like to think of every tree as really an individual with its own personality. >> my husband calls them employees, but they're kind of like my babies. and anytime anything happens to them we feel horrible. and you see when a tree is stressed and you have to take care of it. and if any of them die, you feel bad. you feel really bad. so you want to take care of them as best you can. > and those 8,500 employees continue to work hard for linda and mark who continue to dote on them. they hope to harvest about 15,000 pounds of fruit per acre this season alone. ea@h avocado is handpicked, making sure the stem is trimmed off so it doesn't scrape or bruise other avocados when it is packed. and then the fruit is driven here
know, i'm not that familiar with all of the different science associated with different dietary restrictions and other types of things. you can certainly reduce the instance of aggression in animal models by putting them on different diets. you can make them more likely to be aggressive, for example, by changing diets. i have a sister who is a nutritionist around the corner. she would kill me if i didn't tell you to eat right, you know. [laughter] >> that being said, i do believe that deficits in certain essential aminnow acids and other types of things can certainly increase people's impulsivity. they can increase people's chances of not -- of those types of things, yeah. >> and one final question and i'm going to rephrase it a little bit, but why is it that we treat people who have, say, traumatic brain injuries or other diagnosed mental illnesses in the criminal justice system rather than in the mental health system? [applause] >> so what i showed you today was to give you that exact what is neuroscience doing in the legal is system and so that person of the person with the t
programs, engineering, computer science, all with salaries over $75,000 per year and you cannot just make yourself into an engineer but it might help you with a major you choose. we have a list of the top paying jobs for bachelors degree holders. what is missing, i didn't see anything in broadcast journalism on that list >> you probably won't. >> you do a lot of growing up when you go to college. >> i'm still growing. around the bay area today if you are just getting up we have autumn sunshine coming our way. temperatures are a little bit cool to start your mainly in the 40's and 50's. patchy fog showing up at the immediate coast line. as that moves out we will see warmer weather building in as high pressure sneak back in over the bay area. as you approached the coast line ec thick fog this morning and even a couple of patches of fog. this afternoon we should see plenty of sunshine in most spots. temperatures in the '60s and '70s in the bay. even along the coastline we will stick with sunshine. nineties and hot in the central valley today. 85 degrees in beautiful. sunny and warm around th
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. i'm bara ck o bama and i approvemon sense. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> as the cloud peaked? even though everything related to the personal computers, still have a couple of themes going. last night rht open source softwa software company
to the blind. the governor signed a bill that paves the way. it's science fiction soon to become reality. dmv has to have new regulations in place in three years. >> now a check on the forecast. >> there is temperatures right now, we have 50s near the coast. fog is holding numbers down inland areas where the sun is shining so running close to yesterday's levels. there is a tomorrow morning foggy and cool. make sure you add an extra layer on f you're working or living inland you can shed a layer, upper 50s along the coast. cooler now, don't take this the wrong way there is when i'll be back with a warmer forecast coming up. >> and there is latest spat in an ongoing feud between two silicon valley giants. the business decision that google says apple is going to regret. >> there is a new state ban on dancing. why a mom sued a kid's school for their father daughter dances. >> and abc 7 about to make someone $49,000 richer, and you can click to enter. and right here on abc 7. already like us. and you still have a dance chans go to our facebook page. and see where you can enter. we'llú ♪ just p
's hire 100,000 new math and science teachers. let's continue to focus on early childhood education, makes a big difference particularly for kids who are low income. part of our race to the top, one of the dropout factories out there, a couple of thousand schools where we know they are really underperforming and let's transform those schools. >> in your state of the union, you said i'm putting you on notice, colleges, if you don't refuse this tuition, you're going to see your funding drop. do you see any indication of change, that they have listened to that threat? >> the biggest problem we have with tuition, especially public universities is that state legislators have been shifting priorities. you've got to do your part and prioritize this, how well your state does is going to depend on how well your workforce is educated. but what we have also seen is schools starting to do something about costs. >> and one more note, governor romney mentioned to you, brian, that he supports pay for performance for teachers and he also supports income situations. >> all of this brings us to the woman wh
science center. that is a little deceiving. about 10 degrees cooler in the suburbs. we have dipped into the 40's this morning. 47 in randallstown. 48 in columbia. the forecast for today -- sunshine and a few clouds. my son mount this afternoon after a chilly start. high temperatures -- 74 this afternoon after a chilly start. afternoon after a chilly start. denny's everyday value slam is four dollars every day. wait, is that right? eggs, bacon, pancakes. yeah. that's right. the four dollar everyday value slam. only four dollars every day. only at denny's. roads and check for problem spots to avoid. weather and traffic together. >> a look at your tuesday morning to meet. the roads are shaping up to be very good. 60 miles by out on the north side that we did to the park belt region. as we check into 95 coming out of the northeast towards the beltway, on average about 62 m.p.h. traveling southbound. 59 on the west side outer loop. on the beat of a parkway, 62 just past 100. so far, i 70 living without delay towards the beltway. a live in view of traffic. the harrisburg first way i york
was here and we were about to find out. meet jake, an appraiser for 26 years. he said art-art, art-science. >> what kind of improvements have you made to your home in the recent past? >> a lot. >> reporter: remember that out of control office? now, all business. the cluttered kitchen, cleaned up. and the old facet, updated. and the living room, now spare. the old set, replaced with state of the art. but could those little changes really pay off? remember, the last appraisal came in at $190,000. the new appraisal? >> oh, good. >> that's a lot better. >> reporter: $214,000. a $24,000 increase. >>> and they were such good sport, they did everything on that seven-page to-do list. and it paid off. we said $1600. for every dollar they spent they got $15 back on that appraisal. the first appraisal, not the final word. good thing don't panic. >> and prospective buyers? >> they have people coming back. it's still for sale but they're coming back for a second look. >>> and coming up. are we looking at a bacon emergency? fear of shortage coast to coast. is it time to stock up? we have the answer when
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